12 August 2019

How to Care for a Newly Declawed Cat

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how to care for a newly declawed cat the declawed procedure called a nanak ectomy involves the surgical removal of all or part of the bone that attaches to the nail along with a portion of a tendon and ligament now that your cat is declawed she will not be able to scratch your furniture or you which is a good thing however getting declawed can be very painful for your cat after the procedure you will need to take good care of her so she can recover and get back to her normal activities keeping your declawed cat comfortable give your cat pain medication your cat likely received pain medication before and after surgery however she will still probably be in some pain when it is time for you to pick her up to keep her comfortable at home your veterinarian will prescribe at least several days worth of pain medication for your cat these medications will either be a skin patch or in an oral formulation pill or liquid cats can be very good at hiding pain so you may not know if your cat is actually in pain or not continue to give her the pain medication as directed by your veterinarian you will likely need to restrain your cat to give her the

medication wrapping her up in a towel like a burrito will restrain her and lessen the chances of her biting you giving your cat a pill may be challenging using a pill popper which is available at your local pet store may be safer than trying to stick your fingers in her mouth to give the pill you might also try putting the pill in a pill pocket which is a tasty treat with a hole in the middle where the pill would go to give your cat liquid medication restrain her as you would to give her a pill position the tip of the syringe just past her front teeth and aimed the syringe towards the back of her mouth slowly dispense the medication in small increments close her mouth and blow on her nose to encourage her to swallow talk to your veterinarian if you are uncomfortable with administering the medication or are unable to do so he or she may suggest using a pain patch instead cats can be very good at hiding pain so you may not know if your cat is actually in pain or not continue to give her the pain medication as directed by your veterinarian you will likely need to restrain your cat to give her the medication wrapping her up in a towel

like a burrito will restrain her and lessen the chances of her biting you giving your cat a pill may be challenging using a pill popper which is available at your local pet store may be safer than trying to stick your fingers in her mouth to give the pill you might also try putting the pill in a pill pocket which is a tasty treat with a hole in the middle where the pill would go to give your cat liquid medication restrain her as you would to give her a pill position the tip of the syringe just past her front teeth and aimed the syringe towards the back of her mouth slowly dispense the medication in small increments close her mouth and blow on her nose to encourage her to swallow talk to your veterinarian if you are uncomfortable with administering the medication or are unable to do so he or she may suggest using a pain patch instead confine your cat to a small space for seven to ten days if you have other pets keeping your cat in a small confined space such as a bathroom will prevent your other pets from licking or grooming her painful paws make this small space

comfortable by placing her normal creature comforts in it food and water bowls litter box comfortable bedding toys if putting her in a confined room is not possible consider putting her in a crate however the crate may be too unfamiliar to her and she may not want to enter it wherever you put your cat after the surgery put her food and water bowls as well as litter box closeby if putting her in a confined room is not possible consider putting her in a crate however the crate may be too unfamiliar to her and she may not want to enter it wherever you put your cat after the surgery put her food and water bowls as well as litter box closeby keep your cat indoors if you have an outdoor or indoor outdoor cat you should keep her inside from now on without her claws your cat would not be able to easily defend herself although it may take time for her to adjust to being inside all of the time it will keep her safe prevent your cat from jumping the declaw procedure is painful so you may not think your cat would want to jump and cause herself even more pain however she

may try keep a close eye on her when she is laying on her perch or on other furniture so you can stop her before she tries to jump if you are keeping her confined to a small room check on her regularly and keep her is low to the ground as you can in addition to causing pain jumping may cause the wounds to start bleeding if you see bleeding apply gentle pressure to the bleeding wound with some paper towels or facial tissues for about 10 to 15 minutes if you are keeping her confined to a small room check on her regularly and keep her as low to the ground as you can in addition to causing pain jumping may cause the wounds to start bleeding if you see bleeding apply gentle pressure to the bleeding wound with some paper towels or facial tissues for about 10 to 15 minutes keep your cat's paws clean taking care of your cat's paws after surgery will keep them clean and prevent them from getting infected infection can occur if foreign objects like small pieces of litter get into the wound newly declawed cats are especially susceptible to paw infections unless your veterinarian sent your cat home

with an antibiotic ointment there should not be anything that you will need to apply to the wounds gently wiping them with a warm soft cloth should be sufficient to keep them clean unless your veterinarian sent your cat home with an antibiotic ointment there should not be anything that you will need to apply to the wounds gently wiping them with a warm soft cloth should be sufficient to keep them clean [Music]